1524 Barr Avenue, #2, Pittsburgh, Pa. 15205
412.919.5843
freedoms@bellatlantic.net

Home
Biography
Columns
History Articles
Humor Only
Responses
Television Archives
Contact Al

Home arrow Columns
Columns

There are 223 Ann Coulter replies, political, humor, nostalgia and tribute columns

Choose the column type BELOW

Your selections will appear BELOW

You've Chosen

Category

 Ann Coulter Reply

Published

 October, 2007

Synopsis

 Ann Coulter - Your Tax Dollars at Work

Your Tax Dollars at Work

By Al Owens
The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan could eventually cost 2.4 trillion dollars. (Thatís trillion with a capital TRILL and it looks like this: $2,400,000,000,000) 2.4 trillion dollars for two undeclared wars? If George Bush does declare one, the country may be forced to have a going out of business sale.

That number didnít come from the worksheets of wild-eyed or unpatriotic Democrats. It came from the non-partisan Congressional Budget Office, which estimates that if the wars continue for the next decade the central front in the war on terror Ė will be Fort Knox.

2.4 trillion (Or 2400 billion) dollars would mean that every man, woman and child living in the United States will have contributed eight thousand dollars by 2017. Think about that the next time you need fifty bucks and your Advantage Card to fill your gas tank.

The interest payments alone for the war, according to that report, could reach 705 billion dollars by 2017. (In case you didnít know this, the government is borrowing money from other countries to help pay for the war)

ďItís just a ton of speculation,Ē replied White House press secretary Dana Perino to a reporterís question about the whopping estimate. (Iím afraid the White House will try to buy a ton of speculation, using money earmarked for Iraq. Iíve heard itís going for a billion dollars a ton)

Perino probably forgot (Or was under a rock) back in 2003, when the White House Office of Budget and Management had claimed the war would only cost 50-60 billion dollars, when she added, ďWe donít know how much the war is going to cost in the future.Ē Itís the first time in years, Iíve actually agreed with a White House press secretary.

As I write this, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice is answering some tough questions about misspent money in Iraq.

The Chairman of the House Oversight Committee, (R-Ca) Henry Waxman just asked Rice point blank, ďIs money thatís being taken through corruption from the Iraqi government, funding the terrorists that are killing our troops?Ē

Rice replied, ďThere are militias that are being funded by multiple sources, including people who are able to use the Iraqi system to bring funding to the militias. Yes.Ē

Wait a minute. Did she just say part of my estimated eight thousand dollars is going to pay for people who are shooting at American troops?

Rice later admitted, ďThere is a very bad problem of corruption in Iraq.Ē Well I want my money back.

The possibility of Iraqi governmental corruption is one thing, but there appears to have been little, if any, oversight of the money paid by the State Department to companies issued contracts in Iraq.

>That word came early this week in a report issued by the State Department. The State Department says itíll do better, but why didnít it do better before?

The situation has gotten so bad regarding the lack of accountability of private security contractors in Iraq, that the head of State Departmentís Assistant Secretary of State for Diplomatic Security Richard Griffin got eased out of his job the other day.

All of this, of course, stems from that September killing of 17 Iraqis by members of the private security contractor - Blackwater USA. Blackwater has come under increasing scrutiny by everybody except apologists for the war mess and a few people who keep trying to convince us that Blackwater isnít some kind of rogue mini-Army.

Yet, even earlier this week, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki renewed his call for Blackwater to leave the country.

Blackwaterís considerable (nearly one billion dollars worth) government contracts, is certainly the reason why the State Department had to look at its operations in Iraq.

Especially since their security guards get paid more than American troops. Army Gen. David Petraeus only earns an estimated $493 dollars a day. Blackwaterís personnel get an estimated $600 dollars a day.

Yet, with lucrative contracts, slipshod accountability and even questions about the enemy getting its hands on our tax dollars Ė the president will still continue to go straight-faced before the American public, and imply Democrats are unpatriotic if they donít kick in more war bucks.

Isnít this the same guy who used to murmur, ďItís not the governmentís money, itís your money.Ē Your money, minus eight thousand dollars I guess.

There are readily available documents online that list all of the money spent in Iraq. Iíve found thousands of charges listed through CENTCOM (Central Command) and, of course, theyíre interesting.

How about 3000 toiletry kits for Iraqi contractors? That cost $24,600. Or, as listed, one SUV cost $543,550.00. I found three vehicles that cost a total of eight million dollars. That may seem a little steep, until you consider the very next listing was a 16 million dollar charge for four vehicles.

Maybe these are clerical errors. Maybe Iím reading these spreadsheets wrong. Maybe, just maybe, the war is wrong.