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Category:  Did You Know?
Published:  October, 2009

Did You Know?

Did you know that Fayette County’s men could “restore lost vigor” with a certain “male enhancement” pill as early as the 1890’s?

(I just realized I’ll have to handle this gingerly. Something that didn’t seem to inhibit the 19th Century ad writer at the time)

Let’s just say “Sex-ine Pills” could be bought at a Connellsville drug store, according to the August 16th, 1895 edition of the Connellsville Courier.

The claims made by the makers of “Sex-ine Pills” specified that if you needed them, but didn’t use them – it could lead to your “insanity.”

Such so-called male enhancement preparations didn’t first surface in 1895.

I’ve previously mentioned I found another ad for one of them in the same edition of the Gettysburg newspaper that printed the original text of the Gettysburg Address back in 1863.

The makers of that drug warned of “self-abuse” if you didn’t buy it.

As I’ve mentioned previously some of Hollywood’s biggest cowboy movie stars have paid visits to Fayette County.

Roy Rogers, Tex Ritter, Hoot Gibson and Tom Mix each made the rounds.

Did you know that only one of those stars, Tom Mix during one of his two visits, could boast of having an “Old Home Week” in Fayette County?

Long before he’d starred in 336 westerns, Mix was born in Dubois, Pa. When he appeared at Connellsville’s Orpheum Theatre in July of 1940, he took his “snappy, white roadster to the Firestone Service Store for repairs, he bumped into a fellow named Claire Mogul.

It just happened that Mogul, too, was from Dubois. That chance meeting was the occasion for a Connellsville Daily Courier photographer to run out and capture a picture of Mix, Mogul and even the roadster smiling from ear-to-ear.

Mix remarked that the service station had provided “an old home town” atmosphere for him.

Did you know there are times when I find vintage newspaper stories, but I have no idea what they’re supposed to mean?

From the September 27th, 1920 edition of the Uniontown Morning Herald: UNIONTOWN AS SEEN FROM THE SKY. AIRPLANES VIEW OF HOW YOUR HOMES, FRIENDS AND YOURSELF LOOK DOWN ON MOTHER EARTH FROM THE CLOUDS, SHOWING COLONEL CHARLES M. FEE.

Ok, I get that part. The Penn Theatre was showing aerial views of Uniontown taken from an airplane.

But here’s the part that’s a bit puzzling: (Charles M. Fee) THE BEST KNOWN MAN IN FAYETTE COUNTY JUST ARRIVING FROM MARS AND THE MOON.
Hum?

Did you know that in July of 1968, an estimated 5,000 people took part in “Remember the Pueblo” day in Uniontown?

According to the July 14th edition of the Oakland (Ca.) Tribune, 800 people were also on hand for the lighting of an “eternal flame” at Marshall Park, which was also part of the day’s events.

The Pueblo was a U.S. Naval spy ship that had been commandeered by North Koreans earlier that year. The crew was eventually released, but not before they had been tortured.

Did you know that while Edgar Kaufmann commissioned Frank Lloyd Wright’s Fallingwater in the late 1930’s, Kaufmann had certainly developed ties to Fayette County much earlier?

The Connellsville Daily Courier reported on its front page on July 25th, 1917 that the Summit Hotel was about to hold a “fox hunt.” Horse riders would be tasked to ride through a variety of obstacles in search of a “fox.” The first person who spotted it, would win a loving cup donated by Edgar Kaufmann.

Did you know (and I’m thinking you already did) that Fallingwater has had Tom Hanks, Ron Howard, Dennis Miller, Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie as some of its most recent visitors?

Albert Einstein also made his way to Fallingwater not long after it was completed in the late 1930’s.
Fallingwater was also featured on the cover of TIME magazine along with its creator – Frank Lloyd Wright – in January of 1938.

Did you know that while an outbreak of rabies in Uniontown resulted in more than 400 dogs being destroyed in 1910, a later outbreak resulted in only two dogs being killed – but 13 people had been bitten?

The front page of the May 15th, 1941 edition of the Uniontown Daily News Standard carried the story of how city police officers had fanned out across the vicinity in an effort to head off the increasing number of attacks by dogs that were suspected to have contracted rabies.

But unlike during the earlier outbreak the town’s canine population was largely spared.