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Category:  Did You Know?
Published:  February, 2009

Did You Know?

Did you know that a local baby once got sent to jail? On January 23rd, 1914 the Uniontown Daily News Standard reported the strange case of a woman who barged into a secret meeting of the Slavish Women’s Society in Continental and struck her ex-husband’s new wife.

A warrant was issued for her arrest. When she appeared before the judge, she was holding her baby in her arms. The judge sentenced her to jail pending her formal hearing. She had to take the baby with her.

Did you know that a local “gift horse” once broke free and was later found “grazing along one of the greens” at the Uniontown Country Club? I found that front page story in the June 13th, 1966 edition of the Uniontown Evening Standard. It seems the pony was a prize given by a local supermarket. The winner kept the horse in their backyard. One day it broke free, and a group of young sleuths (aged between 11 and 16) tracked him down at the golf course.

Did you know that some of these “Did You Know” items need little explanation? This from the Oakland (Ca.) Tribune, dated August 13th, 1934. A Grays Landing woman petitioned a Fayette County judge for a divorce from her husband because of the following: "April 7, 1924, burned on leg by stove lifter; July 6, 1924, choked by husband and threatened with death; June 17, 1927, kicked into unconsciousness; October 12, 1028, kicked out of bed; February 10, 1930, face disfigured with hot poker; February 15, 1930, threatened with death by shooting; March 21, 1930, disfigured by finger nail polish; March 2, 1930, forced to leave."

It’s not known if the divorced was granted.

Did you know that in the early days of commercial air transportation, Uniontown was just one of 32 towns thought to be among the first deserving an air terminal? According to the La Crosse (Wis.) Tribune and Leader-Press on June 8th, 1919, Uniontown was on a list with New York City, Chicago and Boston as one of the 32 cities and towns that would be part of a “national system of airlines” of the future.

Did you know that during the height of the Great Depression, there was a massive hunger march headed for Washington D.C. by way of Uniontown?

Did you also know that as participants were planning to come from Pittsburgh, federal agents raided an “alleged Communist headquarters” in Uniontown? On December 2nd, 1932, the Modesto (Ca.) News-Herald carried the front page story of the agents moving in on the supposed Communists who were in Uniontown to “harangue” the 500 hunger marchers when they reached town. The men were then held for “deportation hearings.”

Did you know that a 17 year-old from Edenborn once gained national attention after he’d been shot in the chest and lived? That story appeared in the Long Beach (Ca.) Press-Telegram on September 14th, 1956. It seems the young man was trying to hold up a small grocery store, when the owner pulled out a gun, aimed it and shot him in the chest.

Doctors at Uniontown Hospital claimed that the would-be bandit’s heart actually moved out of the way of the bullet and then it rested on top of it. “The strange occurrence was reported during a medical seminar,” the article said. According to doctors, the shock caused when the bullet first penetrated the young man’s body may have caused his heart to “twitch” out of the way.

At first it was thought he would surely die from the shooting, but upon closer investigation it was discovered the gunshot didn’t cause a fatal injury. He was apparently ok enough from his “near miss” to have been taken to jail for “an indefinite sentence.”

Did you know that a planned Uniontown solar village once made international news? According to the military publication “Stars and Stripes,” such a development was already in production in December of 1979. According to the article it would be named “New Village” and would span 180 acres – all of which would be powered by the sun’s rays.

Did you know that at one time everybody got their milk in bottles left on their doorsteps? Did you also know that a milk bottle shortage in Uniontown was worthy of some national attention?

I’ll explain next week.